The Sugarcoated Language Of White Fragility

 

sugar coated donut

This article points out the many ways in which the discussion around discrimination caters to white people’s fear of not being in control. The way racism is coded in white society is like the layers of an onion. That’s why it needs constant scrutiny and vigilance against complacency.

Terms like “inclusion” and “white privilege” are designed to sneak past the racial stress triggers of White Fragility. They center Whiteness in a way that makes White people comfortable, while deflecting from the stressful realities of the racist harm that Whiteness causes. Imagine how many racial stress trigger alarm bells would go off if we were using words like “discrimination awareness” and “white undeserved advantages” instead.

Read the article here: The Sugarcoated Language Of White Fragility | HuffPost

White People Have No Place In Black Liberation. – RaceBaitR

This is probably not what you think. It’s probably much better and more challenging. White people will likely have a hard time embracing this on the first round. It’s worth the shakeup. This is just an excerpt. Read the whole thing.

The dilemma of what white people should do to address racism has the same exhausting function of racism, because this dilemma is racism. Because for white people “to do” anything means that whiteness must be centered in a way that would perpetuate its oppressive essentiality.

There is nothing redeeming or redeemable about whiteness—by definition. Only the radical negation of it is helpful or freeing. And it is not enough for us as Black people to encourage or allow white people to try their hand at addressing racism. It is necessary instead to adopt a politic of exclusion. This is to build upon Malcolm X’s claim in The Autobiography of Malcolm X that “Where the really sincere white people have got to do their ‘proving’ of themselves is not among the black victims, but out on the battle lines of where America’s racism really is,” (X, Haley 1964: 383–384) with the vital understanding that Black victims exist everywhere whiteness does.

via White People Have No Place In Black Liberation. – RaceBaitR

Class-splaining is just a symptom.

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Not only are there problems with empathy in terms of race and gender, but it seems anything outside of one’s experience is an excuse to put on a superior tone and lecture others. I understand that sometimes being an objective outsider can provide a fresh perspective. Yet that tends to be a different dynamic – participatory, supportive – from positioning oneself as omniscient and higher-caliber than the unwashed masses. Continue reading “Class-splaining is just a symptom.”

White, Male Privilege Illustrated

Swedish artist, Emanu, published a cartoon that perfectly illustrates white, male privilege. You can probably throw straight and cisgendered into the mix, as well.

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This post isn’t really about white, male privilege. There’s plenty about it in other posts on this site, as well as the website for my MA project. Nope, this is about tracking down the artist. Continue reading “White, Male Privilege Illustrated”

White People Whitesplain Whitesplaining

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I’ve been on the receiving end of mansplaining, so I have some understanding of the general dynamic, if not the specifics. Honestly, this is one of my big concerns in researching and talking about diversity. I am happy to be a translator for as much understanding as I have to those who have not come to that point. But this is no way a license to steal the voices of those who experience racism every day.

It’s true that members of an oppressed group are not under any obligation to educate their oppressors. It can be awful on so many levels when someone turns to you and expects you to be the voice of [whatever] group. Yet not being given the opportunity to explain in your own words, and having well meaning members of the privileged group try and do that for you… Wow. A toxic concoction to swallow, indeed.

 

 

Seems that in order to tackle issues of racism, one needs a combination of awareness, social skills, and a willingness to stand up. Perhaps more importantly, we need to know when to shut up. Lack of listening is, after all, part of what got us here in the first place.

Macklemore’s joyous, upbeat anthem marred by sexism, racial stereotypes of women of colour

Macklemore, amazingly outspoken proponent of marriage equality has dropped the ball. Minutes ago, his latest video, for “Downtown”, was posted on Facebook. I clicked, expecting something fun with a good beat. On that count, I was not disappointed. The music is fun, with a full and joyous sound, reminiscent of the era in which scooters and big, theatrical dance numbers were common. The colour palette of the cinematography supports the retro feel.

Something that should not be brought back from the past, however, is the idea that women are only good for eye and arm candy, and that black women are acceptable because “…I like a big girl, I like ’em sassy.”

Continue reading “Macklemore’s joyous, upbeat anthem marred by sexism, racial stereotypes of women of colour”

Allied Progress

Had a bit of a back and forth with a former classmate and work colleague on Facebook about cultural appropriation. It’s one of the biggest issues I am struggling with on this journey of awareness, intersectionality, privilege, and equality. I’ve learned a lot over the last year, but there will always be room to grow.

A newly sprouted plant emerging from the soil.

Continue reading “Allied Progress”